A real buzz in Eastmoor

Greenhill Primary School pupils Paige Baldwin and Jenson Marsden-Milner at the school's new behive. Picture: Martin Fenton.
Greenhill Primary School pupils Paige Baldwin and Jenson Marsden-Milner at the school's new behive. Picture: Martin Fenton.

Pupils at Greenhill Primary School in Eastmoor have entered the world of bee keeping.

Children from years four and five have been involved in a project to develop a school orchard containing a vegetable garden, shrubs, fruit trees and a meadow.

Greenhill Primary School pupils Paige Baldwin and Jenson Marsden-Milner with bee keeper and Paige's dad, Craig Baldwin. Picture: Martin Fenton.

Greenhill Primary School pupils Paige Baldwin and Jenson Marsden-Milner with bee keeper and Paige's dad, Craig Baldwin. Picture: Martin Fenton.

The latest addition, from parent and bee keeper Craig Baldwin, is a beehive. It was installed on Tuesday.

The children carried out extensive research to find out about bees to ensure they knew exactly how they needed to be looked after.

Pupils worked with Craig Baldwin, a parent at the school, who is also a bee keeper.

Mr Baldwin made a beehive for the school and donated a swarm of bees from his own collection.

Greenhill Primary School beekeeping project. Pictured are governor Sue Rigby, pupil Jenson Marsden-Milner, parent and beekeeper Craig Baldwin and daughter Paige Baldwin and teaching assistant Victoria Lodge. Picture: Martin Fenton.

Greenhill Primary School beekeeping project. Pictured are governor Sue Rigby, pupil Jenson Marsden-Milner, parent and beekeeper Craig Baldwin and daughter Paige Baldwin and teaching assistant Victoria Lodge. Picture: Martin Fenton.

His daughter, Paige Baldwin from year four, along with Jenson Marsden-Milner from year five, transferred the bees into their new hive.

Mr Baldwin described each step in the process and showed the children how to use the tools to successfully re-home the bees.

He said the bees had the perfect home in a perfect location. They are surrounded by trees and plants and he fully expects they will produce excellent honey.

Headteacher Martin Fenton said: “The bees are one part of the orchard project which has given the children many opportunities to be involved in planting and growing as well as construction and design of the area.

“The orchard project is a very exciting development for the school. It creates many opportunities to engage the children in real life experiences across the curriculum. We have already seen a positive benefit in terms of children’s enthusiasm and commitment.”