Cathedral to star on the beeb twice in a week

A carpenter dismantles the old pews of Wakefield Cathedral during BBC4's Cathedrals: The Series. Picture courtesy of BBC's Paul Bennet
A carpenter dismantles the old pews of Wakefield Cathedral during BBC4's Cathedrals: The Series. Picture courtesy of BBC's Paul Bennet
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The story of Wakefield Cathedral’s multi-million pound restoration project will be told in a TV documentary.

A BBC film crew captured the final months of Project 2013, the £3m refurbishment to revitalise and transform the historic building.

And it will be shown in an hour-long documentary ‘Cathedrals: The Series’ on BBC4 at 9pm on Wednesday.

The cathedral will then return to our screens on Sunday, November 17, in Songs of Praise.

The Dean of Wakefield, the Very Rev Jonathan Greener, said: “It’s always a bit embarrassing to see yourself on screen but I am delighted that the BBC chose Wakefield Cathedral and we are able to show some of our life and our work to the nation at large.

“I sincerely hope this behind the scenes look will allow people a better understanding of cathedral life and once they see our cathedral’s transformation, we hope they want to come and see the place for themselves.”

Award winning film maker Richard Alwyn shot the documentary and will be the first episode in a three-part series looking behind the scenes at three cathedrals in England.

Project 2013 was finished in March following a mammoth fundraising effort.

Old pews have gone to create a flexible open space for worship, public gatherings, concerts celebrations and other community activities. The new-look nave features improved lighting, flooring, heating and sound systems.

Ancient tombs were among intriguing archaeological finds unearthed during the redevelopment work. The public were invited to view the historic artefacts before they were re-buried.

The excavations revealed worship has taken place on the site of the 800-year-old cathedral for more than 1,000 years.

The remains of at least 13 burials, most of which date back to the 18th or 19th century, were found during excavations in the nave.

Archaeologists also found two medieval stone graves and two probable early walls.