Flesh-eating bug horror

17th February 2011. Baby Rose Rycroft from ossett, who has Downs syndrome and last year underwent open heart surgery at LGI. While there she contracted the flesh-eating bug and nearly died. Pictured with parents Joanne and Robert.
17th February 2011. Baby Rose Rycroft from ossett, who has Downs syndrome and last year underwent open heart surgery at LGI. While there she contracted the flesh-eating bug and nearly died. Pictured with parents Joanne and Robert.
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A COUPLE are demanding answers over their baby’s hospital treatment which left her with horrific scars.

Rose Rycroft, 14 months, made a miracle recovery after developing a rare flesh-eating bug.

But she was left disfigured after a third of her skin had to be removed to save her life.

Doctors said necrotising faciitis had not been seen in a city hospital for 40 years when it set in two days after the tot underwent surgery at Leeds General Infirmary.

Now Rose’s parents Robert, 41, and Joanne, 40, of Deneside, Ossett, are planning to take legal action.

Mrs Rycroft, who runs Rose Tinted business in Ings Road, said: “We feel so angry. There’s no way I am ever going to let this drop until they give us a letter of apology and the reason why Rose contracted it. They still have not said how Rose could have contracted such a horrendous bug.”

Rose, who has Down’s syndrome, was diagnosed with a heart condition at the age of four months. She had heart surgery at seven months old, but was transferred back to intensive care when bruising appeared.

She was left in a coma after surgery to remove tissue from her chest, back and her groin.

Mr and Mrs Rycroft were called to a series of meetings with medical staff. and were told the flesh-eating bug was caused by bacteria from Rose’s gut, which had got into a line in her leg.

Two weeks after life-saving surgery she underwent extensive skin grafts and had her belly button, which had been moved during the surgery, put back in place. During her recovery she also contracted MRSA.

She spent nine weeks in hospital and will need further skin grafts in the future.

Mr and Mrs Rycroft, who also have two sons – say their complaint was not fully answered fully by Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust and have now instructed solicitors.

A hospital trust spokesman said: “After Mrs Rycroft contacted us we responded in a detailed letter last November in which we made every effort to address all the points she raised and provide reassurance about the care and treatment Rose received during her stay in the hospital.