Hornsea residential centre for Wakefield students saved for now

Hornsea Support Group hand their business case in to Wakeield Council.'Mary Creagh, ---, Stuart Boothman and Olivia Rowley
Hornsea Support Group hand their business case in to Wakeield Council.'Mary Creagh, ---, Stuart Boothman and Olivia Rowley

THE FUTURE of a residential centre enjoyed by Wakefield students for generations may no longer be in jeopardy after three last-minute proposals to save it.

Hornsea Outdoor Residential Centre was due to close last Saturday after Wakefield Council decided to stop funding the seaside school.

But three last-minute business plans have been handed in to the Council - which has kept Hornsea open while they are considered.

One of the proposals, which hopes to run the outdoor residential centre as a social enterprise, comes from Hornsea Support Group.

Secretary of the group, Stuart Bootham, said he was overwhelmed by the amount of passion displayed by supporters of the project.

He said: “Over the summer we have drawn in people from all over the district who all share the common aim of keeping the Hornsea Centre open.

“Without their help, we could have not completed the plan. If our plan is accepted, we will see future generations of local children enjoying their time at Hornsea and developing new skills and knowledge along the way - just like our children have done.”

Wakefield MP Mary Creagh and Outwood and Morley MP Ed Balls ware helping the group. Ms Creagh said: “The Hornsea support group has put together a strong proposal for running the Outdoor Residential Centre. Ed Balls and I will be discussing the plan with them in detail next week. It is for the council to decide on the best way forward. I hope a decision can be taken in the near future.”

Coun Olivia Rowley, Cabinet Member for Children and Young People, said: “I would like to thank people for the time and effort they have put into their plans. We will be examining everything we have received very closely before any decision is made.”