Inspiring NHS stories shared

Pontefract museum is having a Paralympic exhibition.'Pictured: Attending: Mayor or Wakefield Elaine Blezard, Roger Ellis (blue top), (coach to paralympic teams 80, 84 and 88), Kevan Baker OBE(red top),  (competed in discus at four Paralympic Games, winning bronze medals in Barcelona and Atlanta) and David Wilders ( started athletics at Pinderfields, competing for the Spinal Unit in local and national games in discus. Also competed in shotput for the GB Paralympic squad and was a finalist for GB in two World Championships (Berlin 1994 and Birmingham 1998).
Pontefract museum is having a Paralympic exhibition.'Pictured: Attending: Mayor or Wakefield Elaine Blezard, Roger Ellis (blue top), (coach to paralympic teams 80, 84 and 88), Kevan Baker OBE(red top), (competed in discus at four Paralympic Games, winning bronze medals in Barcelona and Atlanta) and David Wilders ( started athletics at Pinderfields, competing for the Spinal Unit in local and national games in discus. Also competed in shotput for the GB Paralympic squad and was a finalist for GB in two World Championships (Berlin 1994 and Birmingham 1998).

STORIES of personal bravery inspired NHS staff to improve care standards at the trust which runs Pinderfields Hospital.

An annual patient summit at Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust used real life patient stories to highlight how services could be improved.

Among speakers at the event was Kate Granger, a trust doctor diagnosed with terminal cancer, who spoke of how her experience as a patient has changed the way she practises medicine.

Kevan Baker, a paralympian treated at the trust’s Spinal Injuries Centre, talked about how the care he received helped him win medals, graduate from university and receive the OBE.

Nicky and Chunky Merrick, parents of Zed, a toddler who suffered second degree burns to his chest, talked about a special “spray on skin” treatment their son got at the trust’s Specialist Burns Unit.

And Andrew Pepper, Mid Yorkshire’s assistant director of finance, shared his experience of accessing NHS services after his dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

Kate Firth, the trust’s assistant director of patient experience and quality, said: “Sometimes the smallest things can make the biggest difference to our patients.

“This event was about influencing practice in our hospitals. We wanted staff to listen to the personal stories being told and to use the experience to change their behaviour and that of their colleagues for the better.”