DCSIMG

Pinderfields Hospital-inspectors find improvements

15th April 2010
Health Secretary Andy Burnham Visits the New Pinderfields hospital development today.
Pictured: The New Hospital.
PICTURES: Matthew Page

15th April 2010 Health Secretary Andy Burnham Visits the New Pinderfields hospital development today. Pictured: The New Hospital. PICTURES: Matthew Page

Improvements have now been made at Pinderfields Hospital after a recent inspection found that elderly patients suffered because there were not enough nurses to care for them.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) issued a warning notice to Mid Yorkshire Hospitals Trust in September after finding that low staffing levels on some wards led to patients being injured from falls and suffering pressure ulcers and infections.

Results of a follow-up inspection of Pinderfields in November were published this week, showing patients were being better cared for.

But the Trust was still not meeting all the required standards and was ordered to improve record keeping.

The report said: “People were not always protected from the risks of unsafe of inappropriate care and treatment because accurate and appropriate records were not always maintained.”

Some care plans were not properly updated and patient records were disorganised.

The inspectors judged that poor record keeping had a minor impact on patients on acute elderly care wards Gate 43 and Gate 41.

Inspectors also visited the acute assessment unit at Gate 12 after receiving concerning information about patient care, the report said.

This ward had a high turnover of patients and some stayed longer than the maximum 48 hours.

One patient’s family told inspectors they were not happy with their relative’s care.

The report said: “They told us their family member had not received sufficient medical attention and basic care on one of the days and nights, and staff were not aware of their family member’s needs.”

But the family member’s subsequent care had been much better, the report said, and the family praised night staff on the ward.

Mid Yorkshire was found to have met the required standards for care and welfare of patients. The Trust had also made the care of patients with dementia a priority.

The report said: “Overall, we found improvements had been made to the care patients received on the wards we visited.”

It was also meeting the standard for co-operating with other healthcare providers.

The report said: “People’s health, safety and welfare was protected when more than one provider was involved in their care and treatment, or when they moved between different services.”

Sally Napper, Mid Yorkshire’s chief nurse, said: “We will be striving to continue our progress and address areas that require improvement.”

 

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