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School ‘requires improvement’ as pupils don’t learn fast enough- says latest Ofsted report

Pupils at Altofts Junior School

Pupils at Altofts Junior School

A village school has been criticised by Ofsted for not providing good enough teaching and developing pupils’ learning quickly enough.

Altofts Junior School has been told it “requires improvement” after a visit by the education watchdog last month.

The Station Road school has been given the third tier rating out of four, which means it remains in the same category as when inspectors visited four years ago.

In a report published this month, inspectors said the quality of teaching was “inconsistent”, meaning pupils did not learn well enough in all their lessons.

They also said teachers did not always check what pupils’ knew or understood, resulting in work being either too easy or too hard.

But it was praised for having well behaved pupils, developing mathematics and offering a range of extracurricular activities such as a school orchestra.

It the report inspectors said: “From their starting points, most pupils make the progress expected of them but too few make better progress than this. Some boys do not improve the quality of their writing fast enough. Attainment in writing is broadly average and lags behind reading and mathematics.

“Pupils’ pace of learning is not always fast enough in some lessons because too much time is wasted.”

It also added: “Teachers do not always receive clear enough guidance on how well their teaching is helping pupils to learn in lessons and so school leaders have not been able to ensure that teaching is consistently good.

“Senior leaders and governors have not been precise enough in their planning. Targets for pupils’ achievement and their attendance are not always clear enough or checked regularly enough. This has meant that the pace of school improvement has been steady rather than good.”

The school was visited by thee inspectors on November 14 and 15, who observed lessons and spoke to children, staff and parents. Although it has not yet reached the quality to be graded as “good”, the school was praised for raising attainment in mathematics, where “more pupils are making good progress”.

The report added: “Pupils enjoy a good range of exciting clubs, residential visits and enriching activities. For example, the school orchestra is thriving. Parents say that ‘Inspire’ mornings, when they take part in joint creative activities with their children, are ‘great fun’.”

Headteacher Tracey Peacock said she did not want to comment on the report.

The school will be inspected within the next two years.

 

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