One vision to be a Killer Queen

Charlotte Broadhead dressed up as Freddie Mercury to raise money for the Mercury Phoenix Trust last year. A picture she had taken by the Bull Ring fountain struck a chord with judges who decided it was the 'most outrageous location' in which any Freddie had been spotted. Charlotte was featured on the 'Freddie for a Day' website and won a Freddy Mercury album on a golden disc for winning the prize.
Charlotte Broadhead dressed up as Freddie Mercury to raise money for the Mercury Phoenix Trust last year. A picture she had taken by the Bull Ring fountain struck a chord with judges who decided it was the 'most outrageous location' in which any Freddie had been spotted. Charlotte was featured on the 'Freddie for a Day' website and won a Freddy Mercury album on a golden disc for winning the prize.
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A QUEEN fan who spent a day as Freddie Mercury has brought worldwide acclaim to the city for her authentic pop tribute.

Charlotte Broadhead was spotted in the city centre dressed as her hero from Queen’s famous Radio Ga Ga video during a fundraising day last September.

And a photograph taken of her striking a pose in the middle of the city’s Bull Ring fountain caught the eyes of judges at the Mercury Phoenix Trust.

They deemed it to be the ‘most outrageous location’ captured during the event, which people from all over the world took part in on what would have been Freddie’s 65th birthday.

Miss Broadhead, 22, of Daw Lane, Horbury, was delighted to have been sent a golden Freddie Mercury disc for winning the competition.

She said: “Because I am such a fan it means so much to win this, it is just the ultimate thing to be given.

“The Trust said seeing me at the Bull Ring reminded them of the Freddie statue which stands over a lake at Montreux in Switzerland.

“I’ve had a lot of people congratulating me and saying I looked good on the day.”

Miss Broadhead also had the photograph featured on the Freddie for a Day campaign website.

She raised £60 for the Trust, which works to prevent AIDS, the disease responsible for the singer’s death in November 1991.

She added: “It was great to be involved in something like this and I’ve already got some ideas for next year’s event.”

Freddie Mercury’s death is seen to be a huge event in the history of fighting AIDS due to the publicity it attracted.