Outwood teachers to visit Shangai for maths work

Outwood Primary School teachers Kathryn Greenhalgh, Luke McNamara and Laura Alexander are visiting Shanghia school as part of a training programme. (w621a437)
Outwood Primary School teachers Kathryn Greenhalgh, Luke McNamara and Laura Alexander are visiting Shanghia school as part of a training programme. (w621a437)
2
Have your say

Three teachers will be travelling to Shanghai as part of a government scheme to bring children’s maths training in line with high-performing Asian schools.

Kathryn Greenhalgh, Luke McNamara and Laura Alexander, from the Outwood Grange Academies Trust, will work with Chinese teachers to learn more about their the maths curriculum and school schedule.

Outwood recently became one of a national network of maths hubs which will implement new ways of teaching maths as part of an £11m government scheme. Outwood is known as the Yorkshire and the Humber Maths Hub.

Academics from Shanghai are helping to develop the programme, designed to bring children’s maths skills into line with youngsters in top-performing schools in east Asia.

The Chinese teachers will visit Outwood in November as part of the scheme.

The work between the different schools will then be shared with teachers across the region.

Kathryn Greenhalgh, senior director of maths, said: “It is an absolute privilege to be part of this research opportunity and we are looking forward to working with our colleagues in Shanghai.

“We believe that sharing good practice with outstanding teachers in other countries can only improve outcomes for children here.”

Mr McNamara said: “My main focus on the visit is to look at rescheduling the school day so that students receive feedback on the work they have done on the day they do it. It is something that is already done in China and we will be learning more about how to implement this.”

Outwood was announced as the regional maths hub in July when Conservative MP Liz Truss visited the college.

At the time, she said: “There is no reason why children in England cannot achieve the same standards in maths as those in Japan, Singapore and China.

“We must learn from the systematic practice of these high-achieving countries, who are constantly seeking to improve.”