Seeing the tree from the wood

QR codes have been put on trees in Newmillerdam Country park so that people can scan for quick information about the 80 different species of trees that are planted there.

QR codes have been put on trees in Newmillerdam Country park so that people can scan for quick information about the 80 different species of trees that are planted there.

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WALKERS will now be able to see the trees from the wood at Newmillerdam.

Visitors to the arboretum at Newmillerdam Country Park can use their smartphones to get instant answers about 80 different tree species.

If they simply scan a Quick Response (QR) code next to each tree they will taken to a website where they can find out how each tree got its name and where it originated.

They can also find out the blossom and fruit of each tree and how tall it could grow.

The idea was born after Wakefield Tree Wardens chairman Roger Parkinson was asked a taxing question by park visitor.

He didn’t have the answer to hand, but knew it would be available online.

Mr Parkinson said: “Many people visit this beautiful place and some want to know more about the trees in the collection.

“Producing a booklet for our large number of tree species would be difficult and expensive, so access to this excellent web information is ideal.

“Hopefully it will lead to a greater understanding and interest in trees and their benefits to people and wildlife.”

Some of the tree species with QR codes attached include pride of India (koelreuteria paniculata), Turkish hazel (corylus colurna) and autumn blaze (acer freemanii).

Wakefield Council has worked with tree wardens and the National Trust to introduce the project.

Coun Maureen Cummings, cabinet member for the environment and communities, said: “This is a brilliant and innovative way of using modern technology to improve visitors’ experience. I hope people will come along with friends, family and their smartphones and have a go at using the codes.”