Spanish ‘monsters’ at Sculpture Park

BRASS monsters created from taps, soap and shoes have landed in the Yorkshire countryside.

The unusual Spanish sculptures made from everyday items form the first major UK collection of works from world renowned artist Joan Miró.

The first major UK exhibition of sculpture by Joan Mir�, one of Europe's most important 20th century artists, opens at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park.Emilio Fernandez Mir� and Joan Punyet Mir� (Mir�'s grandsons)

The first major UK exhibition of sculpture by Joan Mir�, one of Europe's most important 20th century artists, opens at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park.Emilio Fernandez Mir� and Joan Punyet Mir� (Mir�'s grandsons)

The Catalan creator, best known for his surrealist paintings, turned his hand to sculptures later in life, creating around 400 before he died in 1983, aged 90.

And around 25 of his large bronze statues are now situated in the grounds of Yorkshire Sculpture Park, with another 76 pieces of art located in the park’s indoor gallery.

They have been loaned from public and private collections all over the world to form the largest exhibition of his work in Britain.

Miró described his work as ‘monsters’ and his belief was that “sculpture must stand in the open air, in the middle of nature”.

And his grandsons echoed that thought when they visited the park on Wednesday for the official launch of his exhibition.

Emilio Fernandez Miró said: “Our grandfather created the sculptures to be outside and with the people and I think he would be very happy with them being here.

“It has been a tough job to get all the sculptures from different places, but the result is wonderful - we are very pleased.

“And we have had many trips to Yorkshire now and we like it here.”

And staff at the park hope the arrival of the Miros will not only appeal to world art critics, but also interest city families who have access to a one-off collection on their doorstep.

The park had 350,000 visitors last year - the most ever - and organisers hope this collection will beat that record.

Deputy curator Sarah Coulson said: “This is absolutely huge for us.

“It is very important that the family of Miró wanted their grandfather’s work to be here.

“I think Miró would think it was amazing to have his work here, especially as some of them are outside.

“He had a childish out look and there is a lot of humour in his work and we will have groups of school kids looking and enjoying it.

“Yorkshire has its own unique identity and so has his art work.”

Miró’s collection will be on display from Saturday until next January.