In a field outside the village of Heath, 1.5 miles outside of Wakefield, is Dame Mary Bolles's Water Tower: a Grade II Listed structure dating from the 1600s.In a field outside the village of Heath, 1.5 miles outside of Wakefield, is Dame Mary Bolles's Water Tower: a Grade II Listed structure dating from the 1600s.
In a field outside the village of Heath, 1.5 miles outside of Wakefield, is Dame Mary Bolles's Water Tower: a Grade II Listed structure dating from the 1600s.

IN PICTURES: Explore the spooky old abandoned water tower in Wakefield that's been 'haunted' by a ghost for 400 years

Look inside Wakefield’s derelict hidden water tower, where a ghost has supposedly floated around for centuries, through these 13 pictures captured by an urban explorer.

In a field outside the village of Heath, and 1.5 miles east of Wakefield city centre, is Dame Mary Bolles' Water Tower - a Grade II listed structure.

Dating from the 17th century, this five-stage, square water tower was originally associated with the now demolished Heath Old Hall, according to Historic England.

The water tower was erected above a natural spring and pumped fresh water via a water wheel to the hall, a once grand 16th century manor.

Eventual owner and namesake, Dame Mary Bolles, was born Mary Witham in Ledstone, West Yorkshire in 1579, and endured a sad and dramatic childhood.

Her father died when she was 14, and a few years later a local woman, Mary Pannell, was accused of having caused his death by witchcraft and was tried and executed for the crime.

Eventually, Dame Mary married into wealth, and in 1635 King Charles I made her a baronetess, something which was completely unheard of in England at that time.

During her life, and after her death, there were rumours that Dame Mary is said to have dabbled in witchcraft.

When she died in 1662, her will stipulated that the room in which she died should be sealed up.

This was duly done and left alone for decades.

When it was unsealed, 50 years later, it is claimed that her ghost appeared and proceeded to haunt the surrounding heath.

Ghost stories and sightings of the Dame have been reported for centuries since with local ghost hunters heading to the tower to try and get a glance of her spirit.

Mystery and wonder surround the tower, and Dame Mary, as much today as it did in the 1600s.

Now, only brave locals and urban explorers dare to venture inside the tower.

The door to her “haunted” bedroom has since been preserved in the Wakefield Museum.

Some high-level repairs on the historic landmark tower were carried out in 1980s but low-level masonry and interior are in poor condition.

The tower continues to stand strong, despite being overgrown with brambles and nettles.

Look through these 13 photos of the Dame Mary Bolles' Water Tower taken by popular Yorkshire urban explorer, Lost Places and Forgotten Faces.

The water tower was erected above a natural spring and pumped fresh water via a water wheel to the hall, a once grand 16th century manor.