Attack victim was struck in face with baton in revenge for refusing to buy stolen vodka from violent shoplifter

A thug put on a balaclava and struck a man over the head with a baton in a street attack carried out because he refused to buy stolen vodka from him.

Thursday, 29th April 2021, 10:50 am
Andrew Hague was jailed for 30 months for attacking a man in the street with a baton.

Andrew Hague was locked up for 30 months over the attack on the man outside his home in Hemsworth.

Leeds Crown Court heard Hague had previously threatened the man at his home when he refused to buy stolen vodka from him.

Mehran Nassiri, prosecuting, said Hague attacked the man on Victoria Street as the victim was walking his dog with his partner.

The defendant said to the victim: "I have seen you now. I am going to smash your head in."

Hague punched the man in the face before walking away.

He reappeared moments later wearing a balaclava and carrying a baton.

Witnesses describe how Hague extended the weapon to about 70 centimetres before striking him in the face.

An ambulance was called and the victim was taken to hospital for treatment to a cut to the top of his head.

He suffered numbness, pain and headaches for days after the incident.

Hague was arrested but offended again on February 21 this year while he was awaiting sentence for the attack.

The 30-year-old was spotted taking two bottles of Southern Comfort and a bottle of pink gin from Tesco, on Market Street, Hemsworth.

He left without paying but was chased and caught by staff.

Hague was found in possession of a screwdriver when he was arrested.

Hague, of James Court, Hemsworth, pleaded guilty to unlawful wounding, having an offensive weapon, common assault, theft, going equipped for theft and possession of a bladed article.

Lydia Carroll, mitigating, said Hague pleaded guilty to the offences at an early stage.

She added: "He accepts that he struck the complainant once with the baton and accepts having the cosh with him."

Sentencing, Judge Mushtaq Khokhar said: "(The victim) was minding his own business that evening and he happened to come across you.

"He had done nothing to invite this attack."