Former Wakefield Missioner to become Archbishop of York

A former Wakefield Missioner is set to be appointed the Archbishop of York.

Tuesday, 17th December 2019, 4:31 pm
Updated Wednesday, 18th December 2019, 9:50 am
Bishop Cottrell (right) served asDiocesan Missioner and Bishops Chaplain for Evangelism in the Diocese of Wakefieldfrom 1993 until 2001.

Stephen Cottrell, who is currently Bishop of Chelmsford, will become the 98th Archbishop of York when Dr John Sentamu steps down next year, it was confirmed today.

Bishop Cottrell served as Diocesan Missioner and Bishop’s Chaplain for Evangelism in the Diocese of Wakefield from 1993 until 2001, before he was appointed Canon Pastor of Peterborough Cathedral.

As Primate of England and Metropolitan of the Province of York, he will share in the leadership of the Church of England in partnership with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.

A married father of three, Bishop Cottrell had said he hopes to serve as "a voice for the North".

Following his nomination this morning, he said: "I am humbled and excited at the prospect of becoming the 98th Archbishop of York.

“I will receive the baton from Archbishop Sentamu. These aren’t just big shoes to fill, but a big heart and a big vision.

“However, I am not daunted. Archbishop Sentamu and I have worked together in mission on many occasions and I hope to build on the work he has pioneered.

Bishop Cottrell served asDiocesan Missioner and Bishops Chaplain for Evangelism in the Diocese of Wakefieldfrom 1993 until 2001. Wakefield now falls under the Diocese of Leeds.

"Working alongside the Archbishop of Canterbury, I hope to help the church be more joyful and more effective in sharing the gospel and bringing hope and unity to our nation.

“Although I was born and grew up in Essex, I lived and served in Huddersfield for nine years. I know and love the north of England. Two of our children were born there.

“I now look forward to returning and being a voice for the North, sharing the liberating good news of the gospel and helping to address the discrepancies of wealth and opportunity that too often favour the South."