'World's first nature reserve' Waterton Park, joins heritage list

Wakefield Council has welcomed a decision to award Grade II listed status to the parkland and a boundary wall that enclosed the world’s first nature reserve.
Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now

Historic England has made the listings to give greater recognition and protection to the parkland at Waterton Park, near Walton in Wakefield that was created by 19th century naturalist Charles Waterton.

The three-mile wall at Waterton Park, near Walton in Wakefield, was built around the parkland to protect wildlife from predators and poachers.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Charles Waterton banned shooting and fishing in the park and created new habitats for native birds and protected wildlife.

Historic England has made the listings to give greater recognition and protection to the parkland at Waterton Park, near Walton in Wakefield that was created by 19th century naturalist Charles Waterton.Historic England has made the listings to give greater recognition and protection to the parkland at Waterton Park, near Walton in Wakefield that was created by 19th century naturalist Charles Waterton.
Historic England has made the listings to give greater recognition and protection to the parkland at Waterton Park, near Walton in Wakefield that was created by 19th century naturalist Charles Waterton.

Mark Lynam, Corporate Director for Regeneration, Environment and Economic Growth at Wakefield Council, said: “This recognition is hugely welcomed as it increases the protection that can be given to the landscape and Waterton’s wall around it.

"It safeguards the things that make them special, and this is likely to be of interest not only to people in the district but potentially across the country and world as well.”

In 1821 Waterton built a high boundary wall - newly listed at Grade II - to keep out foxes and poachers. The completed stone wall was over three miles long and took five years to compete.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Waterton banned shooting and fishing in the park, creating new habitats for native birds.

He helped wildlife by creating new habitats, planting trees and undergrowth cover, and allowing the far end of the lake to become swampy for the benefit of herons and waterfowl.

In 1995 Waterton Park Golf Club opened with a course set around the lake within the enclosed park.