Your chance to tend garden at Horbury’s Carr Lodge Park

Would you and your green-fingered friends like to look after a garden in one of the city’s historic parks?

Friday, 15th November 2019, 2:33 pm
Carr Lodge Park, Horbury. Early Spring

Wakefield Council is looking to complete an asset transfer for the walled garden at Carr Lodge Park in Horbury.

It means community groups have the chance to step up to look after the garden for other people to enjoy and to have a say in its future.

The garden sits within the grounds of the Grade-II listed Carr Lodge Mansion, which was built in the 1770s.

Sign up to our daily Wakefield Express Today newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

Update on the work that has been/ is being/ is going to be done at the Carr Lodge Mansion, Horbury

Andrew Balchin, corporate director for adults, health and communities, said: “The council identifies assets that may be of community use on a regular basis through its community asset transfer programme.

“This does not mean that the council wishes to dispose of the asset but it is open to ideas and suggestions from the local community around enhancing the asset and increasing its value to local people.

“The council recognises that this asset may be of interest to community groups across the local area for projects and community benefit.

“We are currently inviting expressions of interest and welcome them from voluntary and community groups. The closing date for any expressions of interest is Friday, November 22.”

The council will consider application based on its asset transfer policy which can be found online at wakefield.gov.uk/community/community-asset-transfer.

Previous transfers of assets from the council to other organisations have included Horbury Community Centre, Lightwaves Leisure Centre, St Peters Church Stanley, Sharlston Community Centre Land, and the Westfield Centre.

The mansion was built between 1770 and 1775 and was eventually named after renowned Horbury-born architect, John Carr.

It is claimed that Carr was even involved with designing the Grade-II listed building.