Here's a list of illnesses that kids CAN and CAN'T go to school with, according to the NHS

It can be tricky as a parent to know whether or not to keep your child at home when they are poorly.

Friday, 14th January 2022, 12:13 pm
It can be tricky to know if it's something to keep them at home for, especially during the Covid pandemic.

Those little noses run (a lot) and there's always a cough or cold going around.

So it can be tricky to know if it's something to keep them at home for, especially during the Covid pandemic.

Children can get coronavirus, but they seem to get it less often than adults and it's usually less serious.

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The main symptoms of Covid are:

A high temperature

A new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot, for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours

A loss or change to sense of smell or taste – this means they cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

What to do if your child has symptoms

If your child has any of the main symptoms of Covid, even if they're mild, get a PCR test to check as soon as possible.

Your child should stay at home and not have visitors until you get the test result. They can only leave home to have the test. Check if you and anyone else your child lives with need to self-isolate.

There are guidelines set out by the government for nurseries and schools saying when a child should be allowed to go and when they should be kept at home when unwell.

The NHS says that if your child is well enough to go to school, but they have an infection that could be passed on, such as a cold sore or head lice, then let their teacher know.

Also, if you do decide to keep your child at home, it's important that school is called to let them know.

Here's a full list of illnesses your child may come down with and if you should keep them home, according to the NHS:

Cold sores

There's no need to keep your child off school if they have a cold sore. Try to tell them not to touch the blister or kiss anyone while they have the cold sore, or to share things such as cups and towels.

Conjunctivitis

You don't need to keep your child away from school if they have conjunctivitis. Speak to a pharmacist for advice.

Coughs and colds

It's fine to send your child to school with a minor cough or cold, but if they start having a fever, keep them off school until the it goes.

Ear infection

If your child has an ear infection and a fever or severe earache, keep them off school until they're feeling better or their fever goes away.

Chickenpox

If your child has chickenpox, keep them off school until all the spots have crusted over. This is usually about five days.

Fever

Keep them off school until the fever goes away.

Hand, foot and mouth disease

If they seem well enough to go to school, there's no need to keep them off. They need to throw away any used tissues straight away and make sure they are washing their hands regulary.

Head lice and nits

There's no need to keep your child off school if they have head lice, but make sure you let the school/nursery/playgroup know.

Impetigo

They'll need antibiotic treatment from the GP and keep them off school until all the sores have crusted over and healed - or for 48 hours after they start antibiotics. They need to be washing their hands regularly and not share towels, cups etc with other children at school.

Ringworm

See your pharmacist unless it's on their scalp, in which case you should see the GP. Once treatment has started, it's fine for your child to go to school.

Scarlet fever

They will need treatment with antibiotics from the GP. Otherwise they will be infectious for up to three weeks. They can go back to school 24 hours after starting the course of antibiotics.

Slapped cheek syndrome

They can go to school if they have slapped cheek syndrome as once the rash appears, they are no longer infectious.

Sore throat

They are fine to go to school, but keep them home if they start with a fever.

Threadworms

Speak to your pharmacist, who can recommend a treatment, hut there's no need to keep them home from school.

Vomiting and diarrhoea

Children with diarrhoea or vomiting should stay away from school for two days after their symptoms have gone.

What to do if your child seems very unwell

Children and babies will still get illnesses that can make them very unwell quickly. It's important to get medical help if you need it.

For urgent advice, call 111 or your GP surgery if your child:

Is under 3 months old and has a temperature of 38C or higher, or you think they have a fever

Is 3 to 6 months old and has a temperature of 39C or higher, or you think they have a fever

Has other signs of illness, such as a rash, as well as a high temperature (fever)

Has a high temperature that's lasted for 5 days or more

Does not want to eat, or is not their usual self and you're worried

Has a high temperature that does not come down with paracetamol

Is dehydrated – for example, nappies are not very wet, sunken eyes, and no tears when they're crying

Immediate action required: Call 999 if your child:

Has a stiff neck

Has a rash that does not fade when you press a glass against it (use the "glass test" from Meningitis Now)

Is bothered by light.

Has a seizure or fit for the first time (they cannot stop shaking).

Has unusually cold hands and feet.

Has pale, blotchy, blue or grey skin.

Has a weak, high-pitched cry that's not like their usual cry.

Is drowsy and hard to wake.

Is extremely agitated (does not stop crying) or is confused.

Finds it hard to breathe and sucks their stomach in under their ribs.

Has a soft spot on their head that curves outwards.

Is not responding like they usually do, or not interested in feeding or usual activities.