Demand soars for unlikely Wakefield allotment sites

A gardening project in Wakefield that places allotments in the most unlikely of places is appealing for more growing space.

Thursday, 24th June 2021, 10:18 am
Grow Wakefield's oldest member Ann Tomlinson and youngest member Rose Timmerman with artist Hoshi Dee at the unveiling of a new mural at The Ridings Rooftop Mini Allotments. Picture Scott Merrylees
Grow Wakefield's oldest member Ann Tomlinson and youngest member Rose Timmerman with artist Hoshi Dee at the unveiling of a new mural at The Ridings Rooftop Mini Allotments. Picture Scott Merrylees

Incredible Edible Wakefield which has now changed its name to Grow Wakefield, says a surge in interest in growing fruit and vegetables has left them needing more plotting areas.

The local social enterprise, which is almost 10 years old, provides mini plots, tools and guidance for those wanting to get involved.

Andy Austerfield, chief executive of the project said: “In the last year we have seen a huge interest from people wanting to grow their own food.

“Every time we have advertised our mini plots we have been over-subscribed and we would love more offers of unloved space and funding from businesses and large organisations so we can create more food growing places.”

Grow Wakefield has 12 edible gardening clubs with over 100 plot holders and 10 edible community allotment gardens.

It also has a number of projects and initiatives which range from community workshops to an urban harvesting group.

Some of the more bizarre plots include the rooftop of The Ridings, where plot holders gathered this week to launch the new name of the group, and unveil a new mural painted by one of its plotholders, Hoshi Dee.

Mr Austerfield said: “Every organisation develops over the years and we felt the time had come for a new name to go with our new look.

“All our sites will be receiving new signs over the coming months.

“We are not just growing fruit and vegetables, friendships also grow.

“Ninety-eight per cent of our plot holders felt they had benefitted from improved health and wellbeing from gardening over the last year.”

Anyone with potential plot space can email Mr Austerfield on [email protected]