Meet the Wakefield dog rescue charity fighting to keep huskies out of the pound and find them a forever home

Dog rescue charity 8 Below Husky Rescue is fighting to educate owners on how best to care for their pets.

By Abi Whistance
Thursday, 9th June 2022, 10:25 am
Updated Thursday, 9th June 2022, 10:27 am

After the pandemic led to a boom in buying puppies, organisations like the Wakefield-based charity are striving to promote animal welfare through responsible ownership.

Nicola Atkinson, trustee at 8 Below Husky Rescue, said: “During the pandemic, people decided to go get puppies because they had lots of spare time and were at home. No home checks were completed nor any checks on the suitability of that specific home for the dog.

“People have gone back to work and the dogs are being left for long hours on their own – there’s no good outcome from that.”

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Dog rescue charity 8 Below Husky Rescue is fighting to educate owners on how best to care for their pets.

Founded in 2013, the charity has worked tirelessly to help hundreds of dogs each year find suitable new homes in an environment that allows them to fulfil their potential.

Yet with such high numbers of dogs being relinquished, and even more finding themselves in council pounds at risk of euthanasia, the task gets harder all the time.

To help prospective new owners come to terms with the responsibility of having a dog, the team goes out of its way to educate people on the specific needs of each dog at the rescue centre, using their in-depth knowledge of the breed to help pair up new owners with a dog that suits their lifestyle.

“You need to do your research,” Nicola went on to say. “I can’t emphasise that enough. “We also have a mandatory minimum six foot fence policy – huskies can be escape artists!

Founded in 2013, the charity has worked tirelessly to help hundreds of dogs each year find suitable new homes in an environment that allows them to fulfil their potential.

“You’ve got to have plenty of time for exercise and mental stimulation and they all have their own individual quirks and personalities.”

With 167 dogs on the waiting list to be taken in by the charity, it is no wonder that the team is so determined to make sure any pairings work first time around.